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Become a champion of your industry

Services and Competencies for a business in a changing world

Become a champion of your industry Services and Competencies for a business in a changing world

Werden Sie zum Champion Ihrer Branche

Leistungen und Kompetenzen für ein Business im Wandel

Werden Sie zum Champion Ihrer Branche Leistungen und Kompetenzen für ein Business im Wandel

IT-Services

End-to-end services with a clear business focus are at the heart of the HDP's consulting services for innovative service concepts:

 

 

The requirements of increasing digitalization, flexibilization, and the expansion of the use of cloud technologies, to name just a few, result in a whole range of new and expanded challenges for IT services and IT service management:

  • Flexibilisation of service provision and underlying service models
  • Increasing agility in the implementation and adaptation of IT services
  • Development and management of new IT services through the increasing use of new technologies (e.g. cloud)
  • Management and coordination of a fragmented service landscape and a large number of different service providers
  • Monitoring and control of IT services using adequate result-oriented methods and tools (e.g. KPIs, reporting, monitoring)
  • Need for digitization and automation of business processes and the resulting impact on IT services
  • Continuous improvement of IT services and flexible adaptation to new requirements

However, the basis for all this is a clear understanding of what an IT service actually consists of.

"What is a Service?"

It may seem an odd question for someone who deals with IT services on a daily basis and provides, manages and supports them. But it is a question that many people cannot answer without further ado. Most will have their own understanding of what an IT service is.

The "ITIL Practitioner Guidance" publication provides the following definition: "A service is a means to deliver value to customers by enabling results that customers want to achieve without having to bear the responsibility for costs and risks.“

This is probably a slightly more detailed definition than what you would normally hear in response, such as: "A service is something that meets a need or satisfies a demand.“

The heart of IT service management is the IT service provided to customers. This IT service should provide the customer with a value to achieve a specific goal or desired result. However, defining a specific IT service often presents a challenge in practice, especially when IT and business (customer) do not have a common agreed understanding of what is expected or delivered by both parties. One reason for this is the different perspectives of both parties:

  • IT sees the service from the application and infrastructure side.
  • Customers see the service from the perspective of the results achieved and their benefits.

So if IT services are to be managed and provided as effectively as possible, the following four key components of an IT service must be understood and described in addition to the content description:

  • Value
  • Results
  • Costs and
  • Risks

The "ITIL-Practitioner Guidance" publication can be consulted again by asking four key questions related to the definition of IT services:

 

1. How will the IT service contribute to delivering added value to the customer?

This can refer to e.g.:

  • additional income,
  • reduced costs or better margins,
  • improved quality, e.g. in terms of availability,
  • greater attractiveness and better retention for external customers,
  • the ability to meet regulatory or legal requirements, etc.

 

2. What are the specific results desired by the customer that are achieved by the service?

It is important to see them at the business level rather than the IT level. For example, an outward-facing online payment function/service would have the task of ensuring that the company can successfully receive payments for goods/services from all customers 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

 

3. What are the actual and complete costs necessary to achieve the results?

It is often difficult for IT departments to obtain a complete overview of all costs incurred for the provision of individual IT services, e.g. from the direct costs of the IT service to the indirect costs that must be distributed and borne across all IT services. Without this information about what an IT service costs, however, it is not possible for the customer/business to quantify the actual value of an IT service.

 

4. What are the risks that could endanger the achievement of the results?

Here, it is not only important to identify the risks. It is equally important to be able to say what is being done to minimize the risks. And in the event that a risk occurs, to be able to show what measures are being taken to make the IT service(s) available again as quickly as possible.

The Operating Model

IT services build the core of the operating model of an IT organization.

An operating model is to be understood both as an abstract and visual representation (model) of how an organization delivers value to its customers and how an organization runs itself.

HDP has developed a process model for evaluating the operating model of an IT organization, which determines the status (and the degree of maturity) of an IT organization and makes it possible to derive a target operating model for the future design of the operating model.

 

The HDP process model focuses on the evaluation of all essential aspects of an operating model. HDP defines four dimensions from which an operating model is composed, and which must be considered and designed in the context of evaluating the actual state and defining the desired target state.

 

As can be seen in the process model, the definition of the necessary measures, whose implementation is necessary to achieve the designed target state, is an essential and decisive factor in the definition of a desired target operating model.

The measures are assigned to the respective dimension of the operating model and transferred into an action plan by means of prioritization and scheduling.

 

Based on its many years of experience in a large number of client projects, HDP is structured in terms of organization and content in such a way that it can provide its clients with optimal support both in the evaluation of the operating model, IT services and IT service management and in the definition and derivation of a future-optimized target picture, thus making the IT organization fit and positioned for future challenges.

One particular strength of HDP lies in the

  • Verifiability of the success of the implementation, confirmed by customer references and
  • In-house process and organizational know-how through experienced consultants, proven business and consulting positions

The HDP consultants provide qualified and committed support both in the evaluation of the operating model and in its further development and the alignment with specific requirements.